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They deny him the punching license in Cuba for not being the owner of the house where he lives

They deny him the punching license in Cuba for not being the owner of the house where he lives


They deny him the punching license in Cuba for not being the owner of the house where he lives


Entrepreneur Carlos Eduardo Ayala, from Florida, Camagüey, has written to CiberCuba to complain about the obstacles that the Miguel Díaz-Canel government places on self-employed workers who want to apply for a license to enter the labor market.

As he explains, he has been denied permission to practice as a punchbox because the house where he lives for 14 years is not in his name. “What do our leaders call for flexible work on their own?” He asks.

The affected says that in Cuba is doing the opposite to be flexible, much as the official media fill their mouths making believe that things work differently.

He gives as an example that last November he approached the Labor Directorate to begin the process of applying for a license as a punchboxer and was told that he had to request it from December 7 when the new regulations to self-employment came into force. announced by the Cuban Government in the month of July 2018.

“I left it for the new year and started with the procedures that are not few: metrology, firefighters, Public Health, electric company, CITMA and Physical Planning, where he had to go up twice to finally give a negative response.

There they explained to him that they deny him the punching license because he does not own his house, even though he has lived in it for 14 years. The Government has not taken into account, in his opinion, how difficult it is to own a home in Cuba.

That is why, rather than relaxing, it seems that the State only “demagogues”. In addition, he adds that he does not understand how they can ask for trust from the people. “Can anyone trust them in this way? I do not think so,” he concluded.

Liberal economists criticize the Cuban government for hindering private initiative and insist on promoting the state economy despite low productivity, inefficiency and corruption attesting to its failure.

This week the Cuban Parliament has begun to debate the new Fisheries Law that will cut the number of self-employed licenses because in this way the Government considers that it protects the ecosystem. However, the new regulations do not foresee the reduction of fish catches from the state sector.

Of the 1.4 million Cubans working in the non-state sector on the island, 1.3 million are self-employed workers.

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